Maryland's HIV Prevention Goals and Priorities

Maryland 's HIV prevention goals and priorities are based on the available information about the distribution of the epidemic within the state, efficacy studies, and relevant behavioral literature.

Advancing HIV Prevention

The CDC's (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) initiative, Advancing HIV Prevention: New Strategies for a Changing Epidemic, published in 2003, articulates CDC's vision for fighting the spread of HIV during the third decade of the epidemic. CDC's initiative includes reducing barriers to early diagnosis of HIV infection and increasing access to quality medical care, treatment, and ongoing prevention services for those diagnosed with HIV. CDC's website for the Advancing HIV Prevention initiative includes descriptions of the initiative and how it is to be implemented, as well as other guidance and information critical to its success.

Prevention Strategic Plan

An Institute of Medicine report, No Time To Lose: Getting More From HIV Prevention, presents a strategy for the prevention of HIV in an era of new advances in treatment and greater prevalence of individuals at risk for contracting and spreading HIV.

The strategy seeks to accomplish goals in prevention through the use of cost-effectiveness data in allocating resources, proven prevention programs, new surveillance and prevention technologies, greater translation of prevention science to community-level action, and the elimination of social barriers that impede prevention effectiveness.

Maryland HIV Prevention Priorities

The Maryland Community Planning Group (CPG) develops a set of statewide HIV prevention priorities. These priorities are based on evidence such as HIV and AIDS statistics, behavioral science, and input from affected communities. The CPG's Plan is used by the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration in writing the state's application to the CDC for funding to support HIV prevention programs across the state.

The CPG approved Maryland’s 2010-2011 HIV prevention priorities are ranked as follows:

  1. HIV Positive Persons
  2. Men who have Sex with Men (72% African American)*
  3. Heterosexual (83% African American)*
  4. Injection Drug Users (IDU) (86% African American)*
  5. Special Populations (Deaf, Hispanic, African Immigrants and Transgender populations)

*These priority populations reflect CDC requirements and the risks associated with new HIV infections in the state. Within all transmission categories, high risk persons (as defined by HIV prevalence or individual risk behaviors) are prioritized.

These priority populations reflect CDC requirements and the risks associated with new HIV infections in the state. Within all transmission categories, high risk persons (as defined by HIV prevalence or individual risk behaviors) are prioritized. Within each risk group African Americans are emphasized, given the disproportionate impact of HIV in this group. When aggregated, the HIV prevention projects targeting each risk group should serve mostly African Americans. Individual projects do not have to meet these racial goals (e.g., when client level data from all injection drug users (IDU) projects are added together, 86% of the IDU served should be African American IDU).

These priority populations reflect CDC requirements and the risks associated with new HIV infections in the state. Within all transmission categories, high risk persons (as defined by HIV prevalence or individual risk behaviors) are prioritized. Furthermore, within each risk group African Americans are emphasized, given the disproportionate impact of HIV in this group.

 

Maryland HIV Plan​

The Maryland 2012-2014 HIV Plan is the first integrated plan that addresses the full continuum of HIV services in the state, from prevention, testing, linkage to care, and treatment of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The plan is the result of community planning efforts involving providers of HIV/AIDS services, staff from the Infectious Disease Bureau (IDB) of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration (PHPA) at the Maryland Department of Mental Health and Hygiene (DHMH), and community stakeholders, including PLWHA.  This plan details the extent of Maryland’s HIV/AIDS epidemic, on both statewide and regional levels, identifies impacted communities, and describes the current continuum of care of HIV services in the state. Key barriers to accessing/delivering services, as well as service gaps are identified. This document details Maryland’s plan to meet the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) over the next three years.